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Guardian: Another Fine Press Excess Mess


If I wrote that health facilities may be contributing to the spread of diseases, such as Ebola (or HIV), I’d be accused of spreading scare stories. But because it’s the English Guardian, and it’s about sex in an African country, they can publish with impunity a story with the title ‘Ebola vaccine offered in exchange for sex, say women in Congo‘.

A quick read through the article shows that the title is wholly unmerited. And even the WHO has acknowledged that 86% of people infected with ebola in several hotspots have worked at or visited health centers recently. So the “deep mistrust of health workers” in the DRC may not be as misguided as the Guardian seems to suggest.

The Guardian continues: “Suspicion of authorities and health agencies has further hampered efforts to contain the response”. The Guardian tends to avoid suggestions that suspicion of health agencies is ever justified. They prefer to point the finger at gender based violence, sex, bats, women, corpse touchers, anything to avoid the admission that ebola epidemics cannot possibly be a simple matter of individual behavior, traditional practices, etc.

The article is not an isolated example of the Guardian’s fantasies about exotic sexual behavior, occult practices, primitive people, violent men and hapless female and child victims, without power or agency. Another in the series had the title ‘Women in sub-Saharan Africa forced into sex to pay hospital bills‘, based on research that did not warrant anything so salacious.

A third article in the Guardian screams “Girls are literally selling their bodies to get sanitary pads“, which is a quote from a researcher more anxious to get publicity for her work than to address some very serious issues in developing countries. Read the research in question and you will not come away with the impressions that the Guardian would have us believe.

And a fourth claims that dating apps in Pakistan (a very low HIV prevalence developing country, where several outbreaks of healthcare associated HIV have been described) are leading to an increase in transmission rates (there is no evidence of any correlation, let alone a causal connection, it’s just speculation).

It’s not just the English Guardian that plumbs the depths of tabloid journalism when it comes to ‘Africa’, nor are all the bizarre, not too credible and very badly researched issues always about sex. For example, some may remember reading articles about people on ARVs eating cow dung because they had no other food, in the BBC and elsewhere.

This story was repeated in a few other countries. Less attention was given to a woman who said she made up the story because she was told she would have to come up with something good in order to get money to buy food.

Other stories that seem belittling and (often obviously) untrue include one about men who have anal sex having to use adult diapers, people renting out used condoms and washing them before renting them out again, assumptions about ‘African’ sexuality (which can also be found on the BBC site, for example), etc.

Other news outlets that seem unable to resist trivial, belittling and often simply untrue stories about some African countries include IRIN (condom recycling), and Reuters, whose articles, like the BBC’s, are often used to back up newspaper articles, or are syndicated in African newspapers.

Aside from being insulting and demeaning, especially to people from African countries and women, these stories deflect attention from extremely serious risks that people in developing countries face, such as unsafe healthcare (which has been shown to contribute to outbreaks of HIV, Ebola, TB, hepatitis C and others), lack of sanitary and reproductive health services and supplies, misuse of medicines and many others.

The consequences of such irresponsible reporting by some of the most trusted news outlets go far beyond the often trivial gossip that purports to be news. If healthcare facilities are unsafe, people should avoid them, especially if authorities (and the press) try to cover up and lie about the risks, at least until healthcare associated outbreaks of deadly conditions are investigated and addressed adequately.

But if unsafe healthcare is deadly, so is the press that lies about it, the press that slings muck at anyone who dares to suggest that ‘professionals’ don’t always know best, the press that loves to brand people as ‘denialists’ if they don’t fall in with whatever is currently fashionable in ‘expert opinion’.

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