Don't Get Stuck With HIV

Protect yourself from HIV during healthcare and cosmetic services

Who we are

Over the last 25 years, many people have tried to stop HIV transmission through health care and cosmetic procedures in Africa. This website builds on their efforts. 

An informal committee of five people (names listed below) manages this website. We invite others to join us in this effort.

Simon Collery (collery [at] gmail.com) is currently writing grant proposals for the Adventist Development and Relief Agency in Tanzania. He is also a freelance development and HIV consultant and keeps a blog called HIV in Kenya, which is about the virus in its development context.

Mariette Correa  (mariettecor [at] gmail.com) has worked primarily with NGOs and the Government in India, as well as with various organisations in other parts of South Asia, Eastern and Southern Africa on HIV, gender and development. She has researched risks to transmit HIV through unsafe health care and the inadequacies of surveillance systems to give accurate data on routes of HIV transmission. She assisted in developing a documentary film ‘Unheard Voices’ on blood-borne HIV in India and co-authored a book on the same subject. The film is available at Tata Institute of Social Sciences, Mumbai, India. Mariette is on the Board of various organisations, including as Vice-President of the Indian Harm Reduction Network. She has a PhD in Development Studies.

David Gisselquist (david_gisselquist [at] yahoo.com) has published more than twenty articles in medical journals on risks to transmit HIV through health care, with special attention to Africa and India. He has traveled and worked in Africa and Asia, and has assisted field research on HIV in India and Kenya. His history of HIV and unsafe health care, Points to Consider, is available for free download. David has spoken at WHO and at international AIDS conferences, and has co-edited a collection of country studies on injection practices that WHO published in 2003: Pilot-Testing the WHO Tools to Assess and Evaluate Injection Practices. David has a PhD in economics, with experience in anthropology, agriculture, and rural development.

Lucy Hancock is a consultant in Washington, DC working on weather and climate services.

Garance Upham was instrumental in creating the first French language NGO and journal on AIDS in Africa in the eighties: SidAlerte International, it developed a network of country based ‘SidAlerte”, such as SidAlerte Guinea (Conakry), SidAlerte Mali, SidAlerte Senegal, SidAlerte Benin, SidAlerte Cameroon, and so forth. It published a monthly French journal SidAlerte. With financial support from the French Cooperation Ministry, SidAlerte organized training seminars involving MoH, health care workers associations and TU, as well as community groups and some of the first PLWAs organisations on the topic “Prevention of HIV, Hepatitis and other bloodborne pathogens in health care settings”. In the nineties, the prevention of tuberculosis was added to the seminars program, in association with SidAlerte’s quarterly publication TB and HIV. Now living in Geneva, Garance continues to be involved in infection control – patient safety and quality care globally with a special emphasis on Africa. She is a member of several NGOs, including the RIPAQS and the People’s Health Movement. With French speaking African nationals, she is working on a French translation of this website, illustration, and distribution. If you want to collaborate you may reach her at: safeobserver [at] gmail.com

4 responses to “Who we are

  1. Dan May 1, 2014 at 11:37 pm

    Hi, I am wondering whether you are talking about HIV transmission in Laboratory and health care conditions or in environmental conditions. Just so I can judge this situation for myself.

    Many thanks.

    • davidgisselquist April 18, 2015 at 7:02 pm

      Hi Dan, Thanks much for your question. Sorry for this late reply.
      I’m not clear about what you mean by “environmental conditions.” Casual contacts are safe — kissing, sharing food and clothes, etc, with someone who is HIV-positive. We are warning about blood-to-blood transmission through skin-piercing instruments. There is also some risk to get HIV from blood spills, blood-stained clothes, bleeding sores, etc — but the risk is very low for someone who doesn’t have a cut through which trace amounts of blood could enter.

  2. Gabe jones March 28, 2017 at 11:15 pm

    Hi- I may have been exposed via a glory hole to insertive anal sex. I don’t know if it was oral or anal. These are my tests thus far
    HIV rna test through labcorp day -15 negative
    Alere combo rapid test day 16 negative
    4th gen lab combo test day 16 negative
    Alere combo rapid test day 22 negative
    HIV rna test through labcorp day 24 negative
    Insti rapid test day 29 negative
    4th gen combo EIA test lab test day 30 negative

    What are my chances of these combination of tests being false negative? Shouldn’t rna combined with 4 week 4th gen be close to 100 percent?

    • Simon Collery March 29, 2017 at 5:05 am

      Thank you for your message. I’m afraid I would have no idea how to answer it, it would be better to ask at the clinic where all these tests were administered, or ask your physician.

Leave a Reply (Please feel free to do so anonymously)

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: