Don't Get Stuck With HIV

Protect yourself from HIV during healthcare and cosmetic services

Patron observed sterile treatment for piercing

POST for piercing
1. Avoid skin-piercing procedures Avoiding is safest, but this is not necessary. You can easily ensure you receive a safe procedure. See below.
2. Use new disposable instruments If you receive a piercing, use a gold or silver wire or a gun and stud, and ensure that these are new. Do not allow anyone to prick themselves with the wire to test for sharpness.
3. You sterilize the instruments If a steel wire is used to pierce, watch to see that it has been boiled or passed over a flame for several seconds before use.
4. Ask providers how they sterilize instruments See above. Boil or flame a reused steel wire or other tool.

Additional information about piercing

Piercing of the ears, and in some cases the nose, is commonly done in early childhood in many communities. Later, according to style, many men and women arrange for additional body piercing (including especially ear and nose piercing).

Piercing may be accomplished by one of three methods. Ear and nose piercing is often done with a gold wire, which is twisted and left in the hole. Because a new gold wire is used for each client, this does not transmit disease from one client to another. However, to show that the wire is sharp, some piercers may prick their finger to draw blood before piercing. Don’t allow this; it is a risk to transmit HIV and other bloodborne pathogens.

Another common method is to pierce with a steel wire, after which a gold wire or stud is placed in the hole. With this method, the steel wire might be reused without sterilization, posing a risk to transmit HIV. In some beauty salons, the steel wire used for piercing is wiped with alcohol between clients.

Currently, piercing is often accomplished with a gun, which shoots a stud into an ear or nose. This stud remains in the hole. Because a new stud is used for each client, this presents no risk to transmit HIV from a previous client.

Risks to get HIV from piercing

If a tool (such as a steel wire) is reused to pierce ears, noses, or other body parts without any effort to clean, or if the piercer first pricks his or her finger to show that the wire is sharp, the risk to transmit HIV from an infected client or piercer to a subsequent client may be estimated at less than 1% (see Table on Estimated Risks in Blood-borne Risks section). Although piercing is a deep wound, the needle used is not hollow (as in an injection), so less blood is involved.

If the wire is new, boiled, or heated in a flame, or if you get a new stud, you have not chance to get HIV from piercing.

2 responses to “Patron observed sterile treatment for piercing

  1. Pingback: Risk of Blood-borne Viruses from Skin-piercing Beauty Treatments | Don't Get Stuck With HIV

  2. Pingback: Risk of Blood-borne Viruses from Skin-piercing Beauty Treatments | Blogtivist

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